Original Research

A South African institution perspective of a framework for enterprise resource planning systems

Tahani P. Shimange, Komla Pillay
South African Journal of Information Management | Vol 25, No 1 | a1578 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajim.v25i1.1578 | © 2023 Tahani P. Shimange, Komla Pillay | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 05 June 2022 | Published: 25 January 2023

About the author(s)

Tahani P. Shimange, Department of Informatics, Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
Komla Pillay, Department of Informatics, Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Public sector organisations encounter many challenges because of their complex legislative requirements, social responsibilities and higher public expectations. In the early 1980s, governments worldwide started experimenting with improving functions and processes through enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems.

Objective: This study investigated the feasibility of South African government institutions in adopting a guideline that will assist in implementing a sustainable ERP system to improve their information systems strategy.

Method: This study followed the qualitative dominating mixed research methodology. A survey was distributed to 20 participants with closed-ended questions to collect quantitative data and open-ended questions to collect qualitative data.

Results: Thirteen factors that allow ERP systems to be successfully implemented were identified. Some of the factors included effective change management policies, end-user specialised knowledge, organisation culture fit, top management support, ERP training before and post-implementation, visibility of activities throughout the workflow, and willingness to change. Sixteen issues that restrict ERP implementation were also identified. Some of the restricting factors include ERP system complexity, high levels of customisation, inadequate flexibility, budget, maintenance costs, lack of vendor support, implementation delays and cost overruns. The current state of ERP implementation in the investigated organisation is of acceptance with growth being achieved gradually and steadily.

Conclusion: The proposed framework provides core competencies such as top management support, ERP training before and post-implementation, and effective change management policies among others, that can be used to establish corrective measures before and during the installation of ERP systems.

Contribution: This study contributed to the body of knowledge by identifying the success and hindering factors of ERP system implementation. The proposed framework outlines guidelines for organisations to successfully adopt and implement ERP systems.


Keywords

government; enterprise resource planning (ERP); systems; deployment; business; implementation; benefits; challenges; critical success factors; organisation

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