Original Research

Sharing is caring: Knowledge sharing at the city of Johannesburg Library and Information Services

Lydia Nkomo, Jan R. Maluleka, Patrick Ngulube
SA Journal of Information Management | Vol 23, No 1 | a1354 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajim.v23i1.1354 | © 2021 Lydia Nkomo, Jan R. Maluleka, Patrick Ngulube | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 12 November 2020 | Published: 27 August 2021

About the author(s)

Lydia Nkomo, Department of Information Science, Faculty of Human Sciences, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa; and, Department of Information Services, City of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Jan R. Maluleka, Department of Information Services, City of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Patrick Ngulube, School of Interdisciplinary Research and Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: The strength of an organisation lies in its ability to manage its human capital. Ideally, organisations that wish to remain service-oriented in this Fourth Industrial Revolution need to comprehend the importance of tacit knowledge and ensure its retention and sharing at all levels. Many organisations fail to capitalise on the value within their tacit knowledge reserves until when employees leave their jobs. Quite often, the importance of the lost knowledge will be felt when a new employee takes over.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine how tacit knowledge is shared at the city of Johannesburg Library and Information Services.

Method: This qualitative study employed the knowledge conversion theory to examine the management of tacit knowledge at the City of Johannesburg Library and Information Services. A case study design was used, and data were collected through semi-structured interviews and document analysis.

Results: The key findings revealed that the City of Johannesburg Library and Information Services does not have an effective strategy to manage tacit knowledge and does not utilise available knowledge management resources. Furthermore, knowledge sharing is very minimal.

Conclusion: The study concludes that the City of Johannesburg Library and Information Services does not manage the tacit knowledge that is at their disposal, and knowledge sharing is also not encouraged. The study recommends that an effective community of practice for knowledge sharing and a policy for knowledge sharing should be established at the City of Johannesburg Library and Information Services.


Keywords

knowledge management; knowledge sharing; tacit knowledge; City of Johannesburg; South Africa

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