Original Research

A framework development for the adoption of information and communication technology web technologies in higher education systems

Kenneth N. Ohei, Roelien Brink
SA Journal of Information Management | Vol 21, No 1 | a1030 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajim.v21i1.1030 | © 2019 Kenneth N. Ohei, Roelien Brink | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 28 August 2018 | Published: 12 June 2019

About the author(s)

Kenneth N. Ohei, Department of Applied Information Systems, School of Consumer Intelligence and Information Systems, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Roelien Brink, Department of Applied Information Systems, School of Consumer Intelligence and Information Systems, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: The adoption of information and communication technology (ICT) tools into educational systems has been at the forefront of the educational sector for decades. The integration of Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 technologies is progressively being encouraged worldwide across several universities to support teaching and learning processes and to offer students the possibility of learning experiences and engagements to suit their digital needs.

Objectives: This article probes a framework development for the adoption of ICT web technologies in higher education systems (HES) and further suggests a framework for adoption with the aim of enhancing the mode of education delivery and improving business processes. An understanding of the benefits associated with Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 tools adoption is gained to support collaboration between students and educators and to build social presence through interactive learning. South African universities continue to experience circumstances in which many learners who enrol are novice users of Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 tools and require optimal support to bridge the gaps and the knowledge and skills exposure required. The problem with educators’ inability to incorporate Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 tools in their teaching and learning practices exists.

Method: A mixed-method approach was applied in this study. The researchers conducted 15 separate interviews with educators coupled with randomly distributed questionnaires to students across three universities (North-West University [NWU], University of South Africa [UNISA] and University of Pretoria [UP]), a total of 969 was recoverable and analysed using analytical tool ATLAS.ti and SPSS. The researchers further validated the data consolidating both techniques used to generate a holistic assessment of the data analysed from the quantitative to support the qualitative findings.

Results: Findings revealed that these tools are useful and will have a positive effect on the pedagogical environment, although there are challenges that may be considered during the adoption. These challenges relate to human factors (e.g. technophobia and cultural beliefs), security issues (e.g. privacy and intellectual property rights [IPRs]), ethical and legal issues, ICT infrastructures (e.g. cost implication, risk and ICT teaching facilities); and university policy frameworks.

Conclusion: Despite these challenges, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0 technologies in HES offer varieties of teaching and learning platforms and an improved business administration process.


Keywords

Blended and integrated learning; collaboration and integrated learning; higher education system (HES); ICT; Social Software (Web 2.0); Semantic Web (Web 3.0).

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